A Coherently Incoherent Closing Event


  • Hunter East Harlem Gallery 2180 3rd Avenue New York, NY, 10035 United States

A Coherently Incoherent Closing Event

Wednesday, May 31, 2017
6:30–9 pm

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue
New York, NY 10035

Join us for an evening of poetry, music, and general incoherence. Celebrating the last week of The Incoherent Salon at Hunter East Harlem Gallery.

Performances include: 

- Harlem Hidden History, a camera intervention by Paco Cao
- An absurd dialogue between Amélie Gaulier and artist Yana Dimitrova about and around the irregularity of the French vocabulary with a pinch of dramatic fantasy.
- "The Arlington Heights Suite" performed by Pablo Helguera with Brian Linden & Candace Thompson
- Cabaret piano tunes performed by pianist Sophie Zhang
- Slide-Show: a reading of image poems by Jérôme Game  
- Ventriloquist Show: by Cardone the Magician

Information on the performers:

Jérôme Game: is a French poet and writer whose work cuts across various practice and disciplinary borders, notably visual and sonic. He currently lives in New York where he teaches cinema and critical theory at CUNY. www.jeromegame.com vantilequist show by  Cardone the magincian

Amélie Gaulier-Brody: is a French-born performance artist based in Brooklyn since 2014. Her artistic practice is dedicated to embodying and playing with the conditions of the body, objects, architecture, ideas, live music, movement and voice. She has studied contemporary dance, theater, voice work with Meredith Monk, Andrew Morrish, Deborah Hay, Rosalind Crisp. She is the cofounder of HAM, high art moment collective. 

Yana Dimitrova: Born and raised in Bulgaria, Dimitrova received her MFA in Painting(2008) from the Savannah College of Art and Design (USA). Her most recent exhibits took place in Brussels, (Belgium), Amsterdam (The Netherlands), Berlin (Germany), Manchester (UK), New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Atlanta (USA) and Sofia (Bulgaria). Dimitrova is a lecturer at Parsons The New School for Design in New York. Through the use of paintings, drawings, embroideries and installations, Dimitrova questions perceptions of space, often using humor to critique concepts of desire and the proposed values of the every day.