Refiguring the Future Conference: February 9-10, 2019
Feb
9
to Feb 10

Refiguring the Future Conference: February 9-10, 2019

Refiguring the Future Conference: February 9-10, 2019

Day 1, Saturday, February 9: Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College
695 Park Ave, New York, NY 10065
http://www.hunter.cuny.edu/kayeplayhouse
Day 2, Sunday, February 10: Knockdown Center
52-19 Flushing Ave, Maspeth, NY 11378
https://knockdown.center/

Tickets available now
Eyebeam presents Refiguring the Future: an exhibition and conference organized by REFRESH, produced in collaboration with Hunter College Art Galleries.

Refiguring the Future will open with a two-day conference that will convene 500 participants and provide space to build community, learn, and share ideas. Unpacking the key frameworks within the exhibition, the conference grapples with the marginalizing states of technology in order to propel us to envision formative futures.

Reserve your seat now for two days of talks, hands-on learning, performances, screenings and more across two incredible venues!

The Refiguring the Future conference convenes an array of artists, educators, writers, and cultural strategists to envision a shared liberatory future by providing us with collective imaginings that move beyond and critique oppressive systems to offer alternative possibilities.

Keynotes speakers include Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor and Zach Blas. Featured participants include: micha cárdenas, Taeyoon Choi, Sofía Córdova, Jaskiran Dhillon, Kadija Ferryman, Shannon Finnegan and Bojana Coklyat, Anneli Goeller, Kathy High, shawné michaelain holloway, In Her Interior (Virginia Barratt and Francesca da Rimini), Yo-Yo Lin, Maandeeq Mohamed, Rasheedah Phillips, Sofía Unanue, Alexander Weheliye, and Pinar Yoldas (list in formation).

The first day of the conference will consists of keynote presentations and panel discussions while the second day will feature a series of community-engaged programs and workshop sessions.

The Refiguring the Future conference is co-organized by Eyebeam/REFRESH Curatorial and Engagement Fellow, Lola Martinez, and REFRESH collective member Maandeeq Mohamed.

In an effort to keep the conference affordable for all participants we are offering a range of ticket options and we encourage you to purchase at whatever level works for you! All tickets are for general admission entry and cover activities across both venues as well as coffee, tea, and lunch on each day.


ACCESSIBILITY
All Refiguring the Future event venues are accessible. For more information and updates, including contact information, please visit: www.eyebeam.org/rtf

LIVE STREAM
The Refiguring the Future Conference will be livestreamed.
Day one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwgwRdxQtI4
Day two: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCa36fWJhyk


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Conversations on Acts of Art and Rebuttal
Oct
5
1:00 PM13:00

Conversations on Acts of Art and Rebuttal

  • Ida K. Lang Recital Hall at Hunter College (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Conversations on Acts of Art and Rebuttal

Friday, October 5, 2018, 1–6pm 
Lang Recital Hall, Hunter College North Building, 4th Floor
Entrance on the south side of 69th Street
between Park Ave. and Lexington Ave.

PROGRAM SCHEDULE

1pm | Welcome by Howard Singerman, Phyllis and Joseph Caroff Chair of the Department of Art and Art History, Hunter College

1:15pm | 1971 Art Students League: Richard Mayhew and Oakley N. Holmes, Jr. in conversation with Lisa Farrington

1:45pm | Statement by Cliff Joseph, read by LeRonn P. Brooks 

2pm | Weusi Artist Collective: Dindga McCannon and Ademola Olugebefola in conversation with LeRonn P. Brooks

2:30 pm | Betty Blayton-Taylor discussing her work, from a film by Oakley N. Holmes, Jr., 1975

2:45pm | Abstraction: Richard Mayhew and Frank Wimberley in conversation with Lisa Corinne Davis 

3:15pm | Vivian Browne discussing her work, from a film by Oakley N. Holmes, Jr., 1975

3:45pm | Where We At: Black Women Artists: Dindga McCannon in conversation with Lisa Farrington and Lisa Corinne Davis

4:15pm | Nigel Jackson and Acts of Art Gallery: James Denmark and Frank Wimberley in conversation with LeRonn P. Brooks

4:45pm | “Once in a While” by Benny Andrews, read by Tom Sleigh, Distinguished Professor in the Graduate Program in Creative Writing, Hunter College

5pm | Round table discussion: Rebuttal to the Whitney Museum Exhibition: Black Artists in Rebuttal 

5:45pm | Audience Q&A

6pm | Closing remarks by Sarah Watson, Chief Curator, Hunter College Art Galleries

6:15-8pm | Reception at the Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery, 132 E. 68th Street

For more information on "Acts of Art and Rebuttal in 1971" 
please visit: https://www.leubsdorfgallery.org/calendar/rebuttal

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Alessandra Expósito in Conversation with her Therapist
May
17
7:00 PM19:00

Alessandra Expósito in Conversation with her Therapist

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Alessandra Expósito in Conversation with her Therapist
Thursday, May 17th
7-9PM

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Ave
New York, NY 10035

Join us as artist Alessandra Expósito and her Licensed Psychotherapist explore recurring themes in her paintings, sculptures and dreams including common childhood maladies, girly animal trophies, pet names for dogs, and the joy of Ebay©. The looming spectre of death haunts her work while a lifelong love affair with hypochondria lightens the proceedings.

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Hunter MFA Thesis Part II
May
17
to Jun 3

Hunter MFA Thesis Part II

Thesis-Part-II-Flyer-(with-names).jpg

Hunter College Spring 2018 MFA Thesis Show

205 Hudson Street Gallery (entrance on Canal St)
NY 10013

May 17th, 2018–June 2nd, 2018
Monday–Sunday, 10am–6pm
 

Opening Reception: 
Thursday, May 17th, 6–9pm

 

Featuring:


Ben Browne
Justin Cloud
Sarah Creagen
Paola Di Tolla
Emily Furr
Carter Johnson
Jule Korneffel
Madhini Nirmal
Russell Perkins
Leonard Reibstein
Todd (T. Eliott Mansa) Thomas
Andy Van Dinh

 

For more information please visit:

http://www.mfa205hudson.org/mfa-thesis-exhibitions/spring-2018/

 

 

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Being Alone, Sharing: Conversations on Survival
Apr
28
1:00 PM13:00

Being Alone, Sharing: Conversations on Survival

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Being Alone, Sharing: Conversations on Survival
Saturday, April 28, 1–7:30pm 

Organized by Sarah Watson and Dylan Gauthier with Alida Jekabson

Presented in conjunction with the exhibition The School of Survival: Learning with Juan Downey, curated by Javier Rivero Ramos and Sarah Watson, on view through May 6, 2018

Drafted in his sketchbook, the phrase “school of survival” echoes Juan Downey’s belief that educators and artists have a responsibility to work towards societal change. Addressing the urgencies of the material realities of the 1970s, Downey’s work foreshadows the ever-evolving crisis we find ourselves in today. Considering our current ecological and political moment, this conversation series invites artists, educators, and activists to share how their creative process, approach to education, and daily life respond to and define survival. 

 

SCHEDULE:

1–1:30pm: Introduction by Sarah Watson and talk on Juan Downey by Javier Rivero Ramos

1:30-2:45pm Conversation with Stephanie Alvarado, Brooke Singer, and Dior St. Hillaire, moderated by Alida Jekabson 

2:45-3:45pm Conversation with smudge studio (Elizabeth Ellsworth and Jamie Kruse) and Tattfoo Tan, moderated by Dylan Gauthier

3:45-4pm Coffee Break

4-5:15pm Conversation with School of Apocalypse (Tal Beery, Catherine Despont, Eugenia Manwelyan and Adam Stennett) and Pili X, moderated by Sarah Watson

5:30-6pm Reading by Lila Zemborain and Mónica de la Torre, organized by Jocelyn Spaar

6-6:30 Intro and performance demo of Datagarden’s MIDI sprout

6:30-7:30pm Wine and cheese reception

 

PARTICIPANTS:

STEPHANIE ALVARADO is a queer Afro-Indigena Latina feminista born and raised in the Bronx, NY by way of Guayaquil, Ecuador. She is a multidisciplinary artist, poet, and reproductive justice scholar and activist. Alvarado is currently the Director of Advocacy and Partnerships at 596 Acres, NYC's only community land access advocacy organization.

Founded in 2011 by Joe Pattucci and Alex Tyson, DATAGARDEN is an arts organization and zero waste record label. DataGarden builds community and connection to nature through experiences that extend human perception using sound, including releasing downloads on plantable artwork; producing installations and events; and using plants to play electronic music with their bio-sonification MIDI Sprout device.

DYLAN GAUTHIER is an artist and educator who creates platforms and social infrastructure around ecology, community, landscape, and social change. Gauthier is a founder of the boat-building and publishing collective Mare Liberum and of the Sunview Luncheonette, a co-op for art, politics, and poetics in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. He teaches in the Film and Media Department at Hunter College.

ALIDA JEKABSON is a M.A. candidate in the Art History program at Hunter College and is the spring Gund Curatorial Programming Fellow for the Hunter College Art Galleries. Alida's research interests include public art and museum history with a focus on modern and contemporary art from the Americas.

JAVIER RIVERO RAMOS, co-curator of the exhibition The School of Survival: Learning with Juan Downey, is a second year PhD student at Princeton University’s Department of Art and Archeology studying modern and contemporary art with a specific focus on Latin America. His research interests include international networks of artistic exchange, art under duress, and Pan-Americanism. He has worked in the curatorial departments of Museo Tamayo, Mexico City, MX; Museo Jumex, Mexico City, MX, and the Hunter East Harlem Gallery, New York.

SCHOOL OF APOCALYPSE––founded in 2015 by Tal Beery, Catherine Despont, Eugenia Manwelyan and Adam Stennett––is a radical learning community organized around a notion of school broadly defined as a framework and container for the emergence of shared knowledge. The school invites a range of thinkers, artists, and scientists to present programming on themes connecting creative practice and notions of survival. Subjects of study are theoretical as well as hands on, and emphasize the integration of observational and material practices found in mystical traditions, creative modalities and scientific field work.

BROOKE SINGER engages technoscience as an artist, educator, nonspecialist and collaborator. Her work lives “on” and “off” line in the form of websites, workshops, photographs, maps, installations, public art and performances that often involves participation in pursuit of social change.

JOCELYN SPAAR is a poet, translator, and artist, living in New York and working at the Hunter College Art Galleries.  She is the poetry editor of STILL magazine, based in Berlin and New York.

SMUDGE STUDIO is a collaboration between Elizabeth Ellsworth and Jamie Kruse that started in 2005. smudge studio designs and cultivates embodied practices that support humans in paying nuanced attention to the fast and intense material realities that are now emerging on a planetary scale.

DIOR ST. HILLAIRE is the owner of GREENFEEN, an environmental consulting firm that uses Hip-Hop to teach sustainability as a lifestyle through green technology and compost education. Through exclusive partnerships, zero waste events, and organics collection, GreenFeen uses this triple bottom line theory to teach a holistic lifestyle.

TATTFOO TAN is an artist who collaborates with the public on issues relating to ecology, sustainability and healthy living. His work is project-based, ephemeral and educational in nature.

MÓNICA DE LA TORRE is the author, most recently, of The Happy End/All Welcome. She teaches in the Literary Arts program at Brown University. Her translation of Defensa del ídolo, the sole book of poetry by the Chilean modernist Omar Cáceres, is forthcoming from Ugly Duckling Presse this summer.

PILI X is a multidisciplinary artist, radical urban planner, and Director of Community Partnerships at the North Philly Peace Park. His work focuses on community development and place-making using ecology, design, education, and art as a vehicle to implement radical change. He was named one “12 People Of Color Leading The Social Impact Charge In Philadelphia” in 2017 by Generocity.

SARAH WATSON is Director of Exhibitions & Chief Curator of the Hunter College Art Galleries and is co-curator of the exhibition The School of Survival: Learning with Juan Downey. Her curatorial interest is in creating experimental sites for education, collaboration, and action, with a focus on time-based works including film, sound, video, new media, performance, poetry and literature. In addition to organizing exhibitions and programming, Watson oversees the gallery component of the Advanced Certificate in Curatorial Studies at Hunter College.    

Poet and critic LILA ZEMBORAIN (Argentina) is the author of eight poetry collections including Guardianes del secreto (2002), translated into English as Guardians of the Secret (2009); Malvas orquídeas del mar (2004), translated into English as Mauve Sea-orchids (2007); Rasgado (2006), translated into French as Déchiré (2013).  From 2009 to 2012 she directed the NYU MFA in Creative Writing in Spanish, where she continues to teach. 

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Hunter MFA Thesis Part I
Apr
19
to May 5

Hunter MFA Thesis Part I

Thesis-Part-I-Flyer-(with-names).jpg

Hunter College MFA Thesis Exhibition Part I

April 19th, 2018–May 5th, 2018
Monday–Sunday, 11am–6pm

Opening Reception:
April 19th, 6–9pm


Featuring the work of:

Patrick Costello
Theresa Daddezio
Rachelle Dang
Pablo Diaz
Mikey Estes
Zac Hacmon
Michelle O'Connell
Hector René Membreno Canales
Becky Jane Rosen

For more information, please visit:

http://www.mfa205hudson.org/mfa-thesis-exhibitions/spring-2018/

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Curatorial Talk: Rosario Güiraldes of The Drawing Center
Mar
29
6:30 PM18:30

Curatorial Talk: Rosario Güiraldes of The Drawing Center

Curatorial Talk: Rosario Güiraldes of the Drawing Center
Thursday, March 29, 2018, 6:30–8pm
Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Copy, Translate, Repeat: Contemporary Art from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros


Güiraldes will be discussing her curatorial practice at the Drawing Center and in her past projects, engaging with and expanding on themes and questions brought up by the exhibition on view.

Rosario Güiraldes is Assistant Curator and Co-Director of the Open Sessions artist program at The Drawing Center. She has organized curatorial projects and public programs at the Barcelona Museum of Contemporary Art (MACBA); University Museum of Contemporary Art (MUAC), Mexico City; Hessel Museum of Art at Bard College, the Judd Foundation, the International Studio & Curatorial Program, and the Consulate General of Argentina, all New York; and Fundación Proa, Buenos Aires. Her most recent project Forensic Architecture: Towards an Investigative Aesthetics was presented in different versions at the Barcelona Museum of Contemporary Art (2017), and at the University Museum of Contemporary Art, Mexico City (2017–18). Güiraldes has edited numerous publications, such as Pioneer Works Journal, Forensic Architecture: Hacia una estética investigative, Staging, The Present is the Form of All Life: The Time Capsules of Ant Farm and LST, aCCseSsions, Compos, and Correspondencia. At Fundación Proa, she also organized Forensis (2015) with Anselm Franke and Eyal Weizman. Güiraldes holds a B.Arch from the Universidad de Buenos Aires and an MA in Curatorial Studies from the Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College.

 

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Student Curators' Hours at 205 Hudson Gallery
Mar
24
1:00 PM13:00

Student Curators' Hours at 205 Hudson Gallery

Student Curators' Hours at 205 Hudson Gallery
Organized in conjunction with the exhibition Copy, Translate, Repeat: Contemporary Art from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

Saturday, March 17 and March 24, 1–3:00pm


Join Advanced Curatorial Certificate students and co-curators in the gallery anytime from 1 to 3pm. We will be exploring the rich source material behind works in the exhibition through self-guided itineraries, short interactive tours given by the curators, and related performances.

This event is free and open to the public.

 

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Queenie: Selected artworks by female artists from El Museo del Barrio's Collection
Mar
21
to Jun 23

Queenie: Selected artworks by female artists from El Museo del Barrio's Collection

  • Hunter East Harlem Gallery (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
Queenie.jpeg

QUEENIE:
Selected artworks by female artists from El Museo del Barrio's Collection

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue @ 119th Street
New York, NY 10035

March 21 - June 23, 2018
Opening reception: Tues, March 27th 6:30-9:30pm

Anonymous female artisans from Chile, Tania Bruguera, Cristina Hernández Botero, Margarita Cabrera, Melissa Calderón, Maria Fernanda Cardoso, Melba Carillo, Marta Chilindron, Alessandra Expósito, iliana emilia garcia, Scherezade Garcia, Dulce Gómez, Carmen Herrera, Jessica Kairé, Carmen Lomas Garza, Evelyn López de Guzmán, Anna Maria Maiolino, Glendalys Medina, Ana Mendieta, Marina Núñez del Prado, Liliana Porter, Raquel Rabinovich, Nitza Tufiño

New artwork commissions by Melissa Calderón, Alessandra Expósito, and Glendalys Medina.

QUEENIE features a selection of artworks by female artists across various media from the Permanent Collection of El Museo del Barrio. The exhibition highlights the institution’s collection with a particular focus on the female artists and QUEENIE takes its title from a sculpture by Alessandra Expósito. The exhibition brings together works which prompt a multifarious dialogue around society and gender through the artists’ varying perspectives and experiences. As part of the exhibition, HEHG has invited three NYC-based artists to respond to the exhibition with a new commission that further explores the connections among the collecting process, societal change, and gendered experience. 

Organized by Arden Sherman, Curator, Hunter East Harlem Gallery, Noel Valentin, Permanent Collection Manager, El Museo del Barrio, Elizaveta Shneyderman, Gallery Manager, Hunter East Harlem Gallery, and Olivia Gauthier, Gund Curatorial Fellow, Hunter College.

The exhibition is made possible in part thanks to support through El Museo del Barrio from the New York State Council on the Arts, and Public Support from the former New York City Council Speaker and the Office of the President, Hunter College.

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Student Curators' Hours at 205 Hudson Gallery
Mar
17
1:00 PM13:00

Student Curators' Hours at 205 Hudson Gallery

Student Curators' Hours at 205 Hudson Gallery
Organized in conjunction with the exhibition Copy, Translate, Repeat: Contemporary Art from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

Saturday, March 17 and March 24, 1–3:00pm


Join Advanced Curatorial Certificate students and co-curators in the gallery anytime from 1 to 3pm. We will be exploring the rich source material behind works in the exhibition through self-guided itineraries, short interactive tours given by the curators, and related performances.

This event is free and open to the public.

 

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Artist's Talk with Jonathas de Andrade
Mar
11
3:00 PM15:00

Artist's Talk with Jonathas de Andrade

Artist's Talk with Jonathas de Andrade
Moderated by co-curator Silvia Alencar
Sunday, March 11, 2018, 3–4:30pm
Organized in conjunction with the exhibition Copy, Translate, Repeat: Contemporary Art from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros


Jonathas de Andrade works with installations, photography and video to explore the borders between fact and fiction. Though de Andrade usually works with local subjects from the northeast region of Brazil, the cross-cultural references used in his works highlight power imbalances present in historical narratives.

De Andrade has exhibited at the Mercosul Biennial, Porto Alegre (2009); Instituto Cultural Banco Real, Recife (2009); Centro Cultural São Paulo (2010); Museu de Arte Contemporânea de São Paulo (2010); New Museum Triennial, New York (2011); 29th São Paulo Biennial (2011), Istanbul Biennial (2011); Kunsthalle Lissabon, Lisbon (2013); Musée d’art Contemporain de Montréal (2013); Museu de Arte do Rio (2014–15); Museu de Arte de São Paulo (2016–17); The Power Plant, Toronto (2017); New Museum, New York (2017). He lives and works in Recife, Brazil.

 

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The School of Survival: Learning with Juan Downey
Mar
2
to May 6

The School of Survival: Learning with Juan Downey

The School of Survival: Learning with Juan Downey
Curated by Javier Rivero Ramos and Sarah Watson

Hunter College Art Galleries
Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery
Hunter West Building
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY 10065

March 1–May 6, 2018
Opening Reception: March 1, 2018, 7–9pm

The School of Survival: Learning with Juan Downey foregrounds the relationship between Downey’s artistic and pedagogical practices as illustrated in his works from the series Life Cycles and Mi casa en la playa, produced in the early to mid 1970s while Downey was teaching at Hunter College and Pratt Institute. These works address Downey’s concerns and theories around architecture, ecology, cybernetics, and feedback. Downey sought to redefine architecture as the wielding of invisible forces—physical, social, and psychic. In his assignments, he likewise challenged his students to reconsider their potential as producers of social change through the transformation of space.

During the late 1960s and early 1970s, Downey (b. Chile, 1940, d. New York, 1993), like many of his peers, became interested in the expanded field of art and architecture, including the dematerialization of the object and the turn towards investigations of invisible energies. He believed that these ideas, coupled with new technologies, could offer the potential for a sustainable future. The works included in The School of Survivalcan be read as blueprints or instructions for enacting radical architectural and ecological possibilities: the production of clean soil (My Balcony: Chilean Nitrate of Soda Potash, 1971); the development of self-sustaining ecosystems (A Clean New Race, 1970 and Mi casa en la playa,1975); interspecies communication (A Vegetal System of Communication for New York State, 1972); and feedback as a tool for productivity and labor (Life Cycle: Soil + Water + Air = Flowers + Bees = Honey, 1972). Created in a historical moment of economic decline, the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, the energy crisis, and environmental degradation, these works are a call to action that continue to resonate with a sense of immediacy.

Presented alongside these works is ephemera from Downey’s time at Hunter and Pratt, including course assignments, peer faculty reviews, and video documentation of class exercises and performances. This archival material further shows that Downey was driven by the ambition to push art and architecture beyond their historical fixation on the visible and tangible. He urged his students to rethink the possibilities of these practices and to envision how they could become vehicles for societal change. Read in the context of this pedagogical philosophy, Downey’s artwork reveals itself as similarly instructive: he recasts the role of the artist from a maker of objects to a designer of futures.

The School of Survival: Learning with Juan Downey is made possible by the generous support from the David Bershad Family Foundation, the Susan V. Bershad Charitable Fund, Inc., Carol and Arthur Goldberg, and the Leubsdorf Fund.

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Feb
8
to Apr 1

Copy, Translate, Repeat: Contemporary Art from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

Copy, Translate, Repeat: Contemporary Art from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros

Jonathas de Andrade, Armando Andrade Tudela, Juan Carlos Araujo, Waltercio Caldas, Mariana Castillo Deball, Elena Damiani, Josefina Guilisasti, Leandro Katz, Jorge Macchi, Leticia Obeid, Dario Robleto, José Antonio Suárez Londoño, Christian Vinck

Curated by Prof. Harper Montgomery with Hunter MA and MFA Students enrolled in the Advanced Curatorial Certificate

Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Gallery
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013

Entrance on the south side of Canal Street between Hudson and Watts

February 8–April 1, 2018
Opening Reception: February 8, 2018, 6–8pm

At a moment of much debate about the status of global contemporary art, this exhibition examines how artworks drawn from the contemporary collection of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros navigate this complex issue by embracing appropriative strategies for making art. The appropriative act enables the artists in this exhibition to confound conventions of time and space and question narratives of history, art, and progress. By repeating and copying art historical and archival sources, literary texts, and objects made far away and long ago, they collapse distance as near and far or “here” and “there.” In one way or another, all these artists are intervening, inserting themselves, repeating some type of source. If they are all devoted to repeating already extant works and images, they are also dedicated to exploring the cracks, the potential veins of growth and expansion, exploration and discovery, that always existed within the “originals.” Waltercio Caldas, for instance, invites us to join him in his study of Velázquez’s mastery of pictorial space by presenting a depopulated version of the artist’s Las meninas. Whereas in works by Christian Vinck and Mariana Castillo Deball, authorship is replaced by the even more extreme authority of the colonial archive or Primitivist art collection, so that appropriation reveals the powerful structures of classification and image-making that underlie the power of nation states. Even more, in Vidas paralelas Jorge Macchi presents two panes of glass which have shattered in identical patterns, completely confounding our sense of the veracity of time and materiality. We know that one must be the source and one the copy, but we are unable to sort out which is which.

Transformation, travel, memory, landscape, modernism, architecture, ethnography, as well as the photograph, the moving image, the handcrafted object, the presence of the body, and painting are themes brought to bear by the artworks in the exhibition. Although their tactics are varied, the artists all take intensely personal approaches to appropriation to question an authority greater than the market or authorship. Directing their critiques instead toward the construction of culture itself, they work against standards set in Europe and the United States even while they are historically participants in these very traditions. They use appropriation as a means of inhabiting works and documents of the past to bring to bear generative qualities that have not yet been explored. In the end, it is by processing a “source” or “object of critique” through their subjectivities that artists generate new experiences of the sensations of the nonlinear often collapsed and layered temporal and spatial registers in which they live and move.

The exhibition brings together a group of artists who have been shown in New York and are collected by major institutions here (Macchi, Caldas, Katz, Castillo Deball, Suárez Londoño, de Andrade, and Robleto) and artists who will be shown for the first time at Hunter College (Araujo, Damiani, Guilisasti, Obeid, and Vinck). As the first occasion on which such a considerable group of contemporary works from the Cisneros Collection have been shown in the United States, this exhibition is unique in that it showcases the innovative challenges the collection has posed to the question of how, where, and to what end contemporary art has been produced around, in, and about the region we call Latin America. Through the partnership between Hunter and the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, the collection was made available as a study resource for twelve students from the MA and MFA programs—and participants in the Curatorial Certificate Program. These students contributed to every step required in conceiving and executing the exhibition, including selection of artworks, layout and design, writing of didactic texts, and the crafting of scholarly essays for the catalogue.

Copy, Translate, Repeat: Contemporary Art from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros is made possible by the generous support of the David Bershad Family Foundation, the Susan V. Bershad Charitable Fund, Inc., Carol and Arthur Goldberg, and Agnes Gund in support of the Curatorial Certificate Program.

About the Advanced Curatorial Certificate
Hunter’s Department of Art & Art History has long provided its graduate students the opportunity to work with faculty and our galleries’ professional staff on exhibitions of exceptional quality.  The new Advanced Curatorial Certificate builds on that tradition and the curatorial interests and ambitions of Hunter faculty and students—and our commitment to exhibitions whose themes, theses, and checklists have been developed and honed by our students. The program is designed to offer both a theoretical and historical grounding in curatorial practices and practical experience in exhibition organization and display and object research and preservation. Every student enrolled in the certificate program has the opportunity to work on an exhibition from inception to fruition, whether in the annual Curatorial Seminar or in faculty-supervised guided internships in the Hunter College Art Galleries or in museums and galleries beyond the college.

coleccioncisneros.org

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Dec
14
to Jan 7

Hunter MFA Thesis Part II

Thesis-Part-II-Flyer-(with-names).jpg

Hunter College MFA Thesis Exhibition Part II

December 14th, 2017 – January 7, 2018
Opening Reception: December 14th, 6–9pm 

Open Tuesday – Sunday, 1-6 pm, closed Christmas Day and New Year’s Day, by appointment Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on the south side of Canal Street between Hudson and Watts

Featuring artists:
Sam Bornstein
Jeff Conefry
Maggie Ellis
Dan Fig
Eri King
Nikki Mehle
Zatara McIntyre
Dionis Ortiz
Eugina Song
Yang Yu
Julie Zhu

In addition to three levels of installed 2D and 3D works, there will be concerts on Dec. 15, Dec. 19, and Dec. 20, and programming throughout the run of the show.

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Nov
16
to Dec 4

Hunter MFA Thesis Part I

Hunter MFA Thesis Part 1 2017

Hunter MFA Thesis Part I

Confluence: Uncertain Archives

November 16–December 3, 2017
Opening Reception November 16th, 6–9pm 

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on the south side of Canal Street between Hudson and Watts

Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

Jongwon Bae
Anael Berkovitz
Christian Breed
Alta Buden
Victoria Dolloff
Christian Hendricks
Katy McCarthy
Lang Zhang

“Archives are not static. Their material reality changes over time – decayed, displaced, reorganized – and their meanings shift as well, depending on the moment and context in which we encounter them.” — Mariam Ghani, Field Notes for What we Left Unfinished

How do ideas, actions, objects and events converge for history to “happen”? Can this confluence be measured? How do we reflect on it? We mine archives for ideas, stories and people and end up also finding conflicts, gaps, and redactions. The sources we draw upon are personal and public: some artists in the show address the history of space, while others speak to a more recent past. Uncertainty occurs any time we try to construct meaning from perceptive and subjective experiences.This confluence is where we connect: to question, deviate from, and contribute.

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Nov
12
3:00 PM15:00

Milford Graves with William Parker and Shahzad Ismaily

Milford Graves with William Parker and Shahzad Ismaily

Milford Graves with William Parker and Shahzad Ismaily

November 12, 3pm, $20, seating limited

The Artist’s Institute
Hunter College Art Galleries
132 East 65th Street
New York New York 10065
theartistsinstitute.org

Hours: Wednesday–Saturday, 12-6pm

Milford Graves doesn’t play the drums to keep time for the band. Emerging in the 1960s as a free jazz pioneer, he opened up percussion to a no-holds-barred celebration of its full vibratory potential. Graves latest work establishes a connection between the vibrations of the drums and the rhythms of the human heart, something he calls “biological music, a synthesis of the physical and mental, a mind-body deal.”

On Sunday, November 12th, The Artists Institute will present a concert and live recording of Milford Graves playing with William Parker and Shahzad Ismaily. As part of this historic event, Graves will speak about his relationship to vibration and music, incorporating his sculpture Beyond Polymath and the beating of a human heart.

Tickets for this event are $20 and will go on sale on November 1st. Seating is limited.

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Nov
8
7:00 PM19:00

Benjamin Kunkel on Steady-State Aesthetics

Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Touch Sanitation Performance, 1979-1980

Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Touch Sanitation Performance, 1979-1980

Benjamin Kunkel on Steady-State Aesthetics

November 8, 7pm

The Artist’s Institute
Hunter College Art Galleries
132 East 65th Street
New York New York 10065
theartistsinstitute.org

Hours: Wednesday–Saturday, 12-6pm

Modern and contemporary art is, needless to say, a phenomenon of recent centuries; the same is true of sustained economic growth, a condition historically unheard-of before modern times and one pursued as an explicit political objective only since World War II. Economic growth clearly belongs among the fundamental features of modernity, and, without it, the compulsion to novelty characteristic of much art since the Industrial Revolution is difficult to imagine. And yet there exists virtually no reflection on growth as a basis of modern and contemporary art and aesthetics. In his lecture “Steady-State Aesthetics,” Benjamin Kunkel offers a set of provocative theses on our default aesthetic of endless growth—a way of seeing so habitual that we don’t see it­—and the different kind of art-making which might emerge in a society that no longer grows economically, even as it continues to develop artistically and otherwise. Ecological economists speak of  “steady-state economics” to describe such a post-growth condition: what might a steady-state aesthetics look like?

This event is free and open to the public and will take place at The Artist’s Institute, 132 E. 65th Street. Seating is limited and is first come, first served. A recording of the talk will be made available online by the following Saturday. 

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Oct
27
10:15 AM10:15

Magnum Photos Inside Out

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Magnum Photos Inside Out

Magnum Photos Inside Out

Friday, October 27, 2017
10:15am – 5:30 pm

The Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College
47–49 East 65th Street
New York, NY 10065

Organized on the occasion of the exhibition Framing Community: Magnum Photos, 1947 – Present, this forum discusses how Magnum photographers have shaped visual narratives within a world that is ever more fractured and uncertain. Across seven decades, Magnum members have questioned their position as outsiders looking in, negotiating religious and cultural diversity while seeking trust and shaping relationships with a wide range of communities. A working group of photographers, writers, and historians retraces significant moments of this cooperative photo agency, debating the meaning of these images as encounters with difference, and looking at their channels of communication and community outreach, from printed magazines to the contemporary digital landscape.

Convener: Maria Antonella Pelizzari

Participants: Nadya Bair, Jennifer Bajorek, Chris Boot, Bieke Depoorter, Reiner Leist, Kristen Lubben, Alia Malek, Susan Meiselas, Fred Ritchin, Carole Naggar, Howard Singerman, David Levi Strauss, Peter van Agtmael

Free and open to the public
Seating is limited
Please rsvp

Convener
Maria Antonella Pelizzari

Schedule

10:15 – 10:30
Introduction

10:30 – 11:45
Magnum Photos and Its Media
Panelists: Nadya Bair, Chris Boot, Kristen Lubben
Moderator: Howard Singerman   

11:45 – 12:30
Bieke Depoorter's Talk

12:30 – 2:00
Lunch Break and Visit of Exhibition

2:00 – 3:30
Documentary Photography in a “Post-Truth” Age
Panelists: David Levi Strauss, Susan Meiselas, Fred Ritchin, and Bieke Depoorter
Moderator: Reiner Leist

3:30 – 4:00
Coffee Break

4:00 – 5:30
Migration, Exile: Communities At a Loss
Panelists: Alia Malek, Peter van Agtmael, Jennifer Bajorek
Moderator: Carole Naggar

With the support of the Crossways Foundation in collaboration with the Hunter College Department of Art and Art History and the Hunter College Art Galleries

Image: Susan Meiselas, Hanging out on Baxter Street, Little Italy, NYC, 1978 © Susan Meiselas/Magnum Photos

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