Jul
8
3:00pm 3:00pm

The Four Noble Truths, a talk by Ven. Khenpo Tenzin Norgay Rinpoche

The Four Noble Truths, a talk by Ven. Khenpo Tenzin Norgay Rinpoche

Organized in conjunction with "Ugo Rondinone: I ♥︎ John Giorno" for the chapter John Giorno and Tibetan Buddhism at 205 Hudson Gallery, Hunter College Art Galleries

With works by John Giorno and Ugo Rondinone and thangkas selected from the collection of the Rubin Museum of Art

Saturday, July 8
3pm

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on the south side of Canal between Hudson and Watts

Deer Park (Sarnath, India) circa 500 BCE: Siddhartha Gautama delivers first post enlightenment teaching, “The Four Noble Truths.” Roughly translated as the truth of suffering, the cause of suffering, the end of suffering, and the path that frees us from suffering (duhkha, samudaya, nirodha, marga), the truths serve as the foundation for the entire corpus of the Buddha’s 84,000 teachings on attaining complete liberation. Simply put, in the midst of sometimes unbearable suffering the truths are a balm, a prescription for healing. They outline a refreshing pathway, just as walkable here and now as it was 2,500 years ago.

Ven. Khenpo Tenzin Norgay Rinpoche completed the nine-year program of study at the Ngagyur Nyingma Institute, an advanced Buddhist studies and research center at Namdroling Monastery in southern India, and taught at the Institute for three years. Formally enthroned as “Khenpo” by His Holiness Penor Rinpoche in 1998, he was assigned to teach at the Buddhist college of the Palyul monastery in Tibet, where he served on the faculty for two years.

Since 2005, Khen Rinpoche has been the resident lama at the Nyingma Palyul Dharma Center (NPDC) in New York City. NPDC serves as a locus for students of the Palyul tradition in the metropolitan area, and welcomes visitors from around the world to participate in all its activities. The center hosts public talks, formal teachings, and empowerments from the Palyul tradition, as well as a variety of cultural events at venues throughout the city.

For more information about Khen Rinpoche or the Palyul tradition and retreats please visit:
www.palyulnyc.org
www.palyul.org
www.retreat.palyul.org

View Event →
Jun
24
3:00pm 3:00pm

Peace and Harmony Through Mindfulness

Peace and Harmony Through Mindfulness
A talk by Ven. Khenpo Tsewang Dongyal Rinpoche

Organized in conjunction with the exhibition Ugo Rondinone: I ♥ John Giorno

Saturday, June 24, 2017
3pm

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on the south side of Canal between Hudson and Watts

Peace and Harmony Through Mindfulness, a talk by Ven. Khenpo Tsewang Dongyal Rinpoche

Mindfulness is staying in the present moment and observing our body, feelings, thoughts, and senses. By practicing mindfulness, we discover a big, open space that allows us to be non-reactive to our outer and inner experiences. It is like all our experiences are dear old friends, and we say "Nice to see you" when they arrive and "Have a nice journey" when they go! This open space brings a lot of equanimity and compassion to our lives, which brings peace to ourselves and harmonizes our actions with others.

Ven. Khenpo Tsewang Dongyal Rinpoche was born in eastern Tibet and enthroned as a Nyingmapa abbot by His Holiness Dudjom Rinpoche. He traveled and studied with H.H. Dudjom Rinpoche, as well as with his late brother, Vajrayana master and scholar Ven. Khenchen Palden Sherab Rinpoche, and his father, the hidden yogi Lama Chimed Namgyal.  As a holder of the complete Nyingmapa lineage, Khenpo Tsewang Rinpoche is fully versed in the Theravada, Mahayana, and Vajrayana schools, and is a master of Dzogchen. He has co-authored over 25 Dharma books in English with Khenchen Palden Sherab Rinpoche, and travels throughout the world giving teachings, empowerments, and personal guidance in fluent English at numerous retreats.

Ven. Khenchen Palden Sherab Rinpoche and Ven. Khenpo Tsewang Dongyal Rinpoche established the Padmasambhava Buddhist Center (PBC) in 1989 to preserve the authentic message of Buddha Shakyamuni and Guru Padmasambhava in its entirety, and in particular to teach the traditions of the Nyingma school and Vajrayana Buddhism. PBC includes over 20 centers in the U.S.A., India, Puerto Rico, Latvia, and Russia, as well as monastic institutions in India, the U.S.A., and Russia.

For more information about Khenpo Tsewang Rinpoche's activities or the Padmasambhava Buddhist Center please contact:
Padma Samye Ling
618 Buddha Highway
Sidney Center, NY 13839
+1 (607) 865-8068
www.padmasambhava.org
Youtube: www.padmasambhava.org/youtube
Facebook: Padmasambhava Buddhist Center
Twitter: KhenpoRinpoche
Instagram: www.instagram.com/khenporinpoche

View Event →
Jun
21
to Aug 21

Ugo Rondinone: I ♥ John Giorno

Ugo Rondinone: I ♥ John Giorno

June 21–August 20, 2017
Opening reception: Wednesday, June 21, 5–8pm

Leubsdorf Gallery
Hunter West Building
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY 10065

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013

Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

On the evening of the June 21st summer solstice, Ugo Rondinone: I ♥ John Giorno—the first major U.S. exhibition about the American poet, artist, activist and muse John Giorno—will open simultaneously across 13 locations in New York City. I ♥ John Giorno is a work of art by Giorno’s husband, the Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone. The exhibition is a celebration of the life and work of John Giorno—an artist whose work has influenced generations. Taking place in his chosen hometown, the exhibition affords a unique opportunity for Giorno’s contributions to be recognized within the canons of American poetry and art history, and celebrates the artist’s 80th birthday. 

I ♥ John Giorno is an unprecedented collaboration between leading non-profit and alternative spaces across New York, which are joining forces for the first time to mount a multilayered exhibition on a single subject. Partner venues include: Artists SpaceHigh Line ArtHowl! HappeningHunter College Art GalleriesThe KitchenNew MuseumRed Bull Arts New YorkRubin Museum of ArtSky ArtSwiss Institute, White Columns, and 80WSE Gallery. Reconfigured as a festival, including installations in galleries and public spaces, as well as a full roster of public programs and events, I ♥ John Giorno is free and open to the public. 

Expanding upon the exhibition that took place at Palais de Tokyo in Paris from October 2015 to January 2016, I ♥ John Giorno has been re-conceptualized specifically for New York, highlighting Giorno’s significant relationship with the city, and his singular role in creating and fostering community here. The 18-part exhibition has been divided by Rondinone into chapters reflecting the layers of Giorno’s life and work, his longstanding influence on and dedication to his chosen hometown of New York City, and his relationships with artist friends, lovers and collaborators including: Richard Bosman, Phong Bui, Angela BullochAnne CollierVerne DawsonJudith EislerJohn GiornoMark HandforthMatthew HiggsPierre HuygheFrançoise JanicotScott KingElizabeth PeytonUgo RondinoneErik SatieKendall ShawMichael StipeBilly SullivanRirkrit Tiravanija, Peter Ungerleider,  Joan Wallace, and Andy Warhol, whose work will be presented as part of the festival.

The exhibition format echoes the symbiotic relationship between Ugo Rondinone and John Giorno, who have been both partners and collaborators for the past two decades. Rondinone describes the show saying: “I ♥ John Giorno is a kaleidoscopic exhibition about the life and work of American poet and Tibetan Buddhist John Giorno, whose rich and stimulating life has woven many threads of American culture and spirituality. Within the dreamscape of the exhibition, one is invited to wander through the juxtaposed realm of art and poetry where image and language build upon themselves in a layered stream of consciousness driven by the biographical, the conceptual, and the emotional.”    

I ♥ John Giorno is made possible in part by public funds from Pro Helvetia, Swiss Arts Council. The I ♥ John Giorno organizing committee gratefully acknowledges generous support from Van Cleef & Arpels and the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. Thanks to Almine Rech Gallery, Brussels, London, New York and Paris; Elizabeth Dee Gallery, New York; Esther Schipper, Berlin; Galerie Eva Presenhuber, New York and Zürich; Gladstone Gallery, Brussels and New York; Galerie Kamel Mennour, London and Paris; Kukje Gallery, Seoul; and Sadie Coles, London for production support. Additional thanks to Ophelia and Bill Rudin as well as the General Consulate of Switzerland in New York for their gracious contribution, and to agnès b. for in kind support.

ABOUT JOHN GIORNO
John Giorno (b. 1936, New York City, USA) is an artistic innovator who has been defying conventional definitions of poet, performer, political activist, Tibetan Buddhist, and visual artist since he emerged upon the New York art scene during the late 1950s. In the 1960s, he began producing multi-media, multi-sensory events concurrent with Warhol’s Exploding Plastic Inevitable. He worked with Rauschenberg’s Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T) in 1966, and with Bob Moog in 1967-68. His breakthroughs in this area include Dial-A-Poem, which was first presented in 1968 at the Architectural Society of New York, and was later included in the MoMA’s Information exhibition in 1970. His contributions are significant to many culturally defining moments: the Beat generation, Pop Art, Punk, the Pictures Generation, and the hip-hop era. His work is included in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris; Musée National d´Art Moderne, Paris; and Queensland Art Gallery/Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane; among others.

ABOUT UGO RONDINONE
Ugo Rondinone (b. 1964, Brunnen, Switzerland) is a renowned mixed-media artist who lives and works in New York. Recent solo shows include: your age my age and the age of the rainbow, The Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow; let’s start this day again, Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati; every time the sun comes up, Place Vendome, Paris; girono d’oro + notti d’argento, Mercati die Traiano, Rome; becoming soil, Carre d’Art, Nîmes; seven magic mountains, Art Production Fund and Nevada Museum of Art/Desert of Nevada; vocabulary of solitude, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam; Ugo Rondinone: I ♡ John Giorno, Palais de Tokyo, Paris; golden days and silver nights, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; and artists and poets, Secession, Vienna. His work is in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and the Dallas Museum of Art, among others. Upcoming shows include the world just makes me laugh at Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley; and good evening beautiful blue at Bass Museum of Art, Miami.

Ugo Rondinone: I ♡ John Giorno is made possible in part by public funds from the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia. The I ♡ John Giorno organizing committee gratefully acknowledges generous support from Van Cleef & Arpels, the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts and LUMA Foundation. Thanks to Almine Rech Gallery, Brussels, London, New York and Paris; Elizabeth Dee Gallery, New York; Esther Schipper, Berlin; Galerie Eva Presenhuber, New York and Zürich; Gladstone Gallery, Brussels and New York; Galerie Kamel Mennour, London and Paris; Kukje Gallery, Seoul; and Sadie Coles, London for production support. Additional thanks to Ophelia and Bill Rudin as well as the General Consulate of Switzerland in New York for their gracious contribution, and to agnès b. for in kind support.

JOHN GIORNO AND TIBETAN BUDDHISM
With works by John Giorno and Ugo Rondinone
205 Hudson Gallery

“When you’re a Buddhist, you work with your mind in meditation, and with various practices you train the mind to realize its empty nature. Strangely, that’s the way I make poems! Maybe it’s developing the ability to see what arises in one’s mind, how it arises and its nature, that makes Buddhism very sympathetic to poets.” — John Giorno

John Giorno was first introduced to Buddhism during his undergraduate studies at Columbia University in 1956 as part of its Core Curriculum.  After several trips to India during the 1970s, he discovered Tibetan Buddhism and became a disciple of Dudjom Rinpoche (1904–1987), master of the Nyingmapa lineage, which Giorno actively helped to promulgate in the United States. 

Every New Year since 1986, Giorno has welcomed Buddhist masters and students to his home for the traditional fire ceremony, during which the obstacles of the previous year are released to usher in the new one. For this exhibition, Giorno’s personal shrine from his home, which is decorated with intricate brocade from the sacred pilgrimage site of Benaras in India, has been relocated to the gallery space.  Additionally, selected from the collection of the Rubin Museum of Art, a group of eighteen thangkas—Tibetan paintings—are also on display along with two from Giorno’s personal collection. 

Padmasambhava, the founding figure of the Nyingmapa order, is depicted in a number of the works. Considered to be a “Second Buddha” in Tibet, Padmasambhava played a predominant role in the advancement of Buddhism across Tibet in the 8th century. Padmasambhava is endowed with superhuman qualities and shown through Tibetan iconography in a variety of forms.

Guru Pema Drakpo is one of the most wrathful depictions of Padmasambhava, an illustration of the powerful energy required to neutralize and transmute the obstacles that inevitably arise on the path to Enlightenment and spiritual accomplishment.  He holds in his hand a vajra or “Diamond Thunderbolt,” a symbol of Enlightenment and a ritual object.  Padmasambhava is believed to have been essential to the dissemination of the teachings of the Vajrakila, also known as the “Diamond Dagger,” throughout Tibet.

Conversely, Guru Pema Jungne is a more peaceful depiction of Padmasambhava. Known as the “Lotus-Born,” he is often shown sitting on a flower and dressed in the robes of a monk, teaching Dharma to the people.  In his right hand he holds a diamond scepter, while in his left he holds a skullcap of clear nectar.

AIDS TREATMENT PROJECT
With works by John Giorno, Ugo Rondinone and Peter Ungerleider
205 Hudson Gallery

205 Hudson Gallery presents material from Giorno’s AIDS Treatment Project begun in 1984. Conceived as a direct-action program, Giorno described it as “my personal effort to combat with all-pervasive compassion, the catastrophe of the AIDS epidemic. Cash grants for emergency situations: back rent, telephone and utilities, food, nursing, alternative medicine not covered by Medicaid, taxis, whatever is needed. Money given with love and affection.”

Facilitated through his non-profit foundation, Giorno Poetry Systems, many artists in his LP series, such as William Burroughs, Allen Ginsberg, and Patti Smith, among many others, donated their royalties to the AIDS Treatment Project. Giorno also organized benefit performances at the Beacon Theater with artists including Debbie Harry, Philip Glass, Laurie Anderson and Sonic Youth; posters from these concerts are included here. The AIDS Treatment Project concluded in 2004, though Giorno has continued to help poets and artists since with medical problems.

Peter Ungerleider’s film Loving Kindness, presented with the AIDS Treatment Project documentation, is a portrait of Giorno that focuses on his work with the AIDS Treatment Project interspersed with his musings on death within the Tibetan Buddhist tradition.

JOHN GIORNO DANCING
Kendall Shaw
Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery

The Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery displays works by Kendall Shaw depicting his close friend John Giorno. In 1963, Shaw took photos of Giorno dancing that later inspired his spare paintings whose black outlines and colorful silhouettes depict Giorno’s body in motion. The works were first exhibited at the Tibor de Nagy gallery in September 1964. For the first time, a number of Shaw’s original photographs will also be exhibited alongside the paintings.  

GRASPING AT EMPTINESS
Richard Bosman and John Giorno
Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery

Also on view at the Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery is Grasping at Emptiness, a collaboration featuring Giorno’s 1978 eponymous poem and 20 drawings by Richard Bosman. Bosman’s dynamic depictions of frustration evoke Giorno’s poem about a fraught end to a relationship. This book was published in 1985 by the Kulchur Foundation, an independent press and granting organization that supported poets and critics now primarily known as part of the New York School. 

Ugo Rondinone: I ♥ John Giorno is made possible by the generous support of the David Bershad Family Foundation, the Susan V. Bershad Charitable Fund, Inc., Arthur and Carol Kaufman Goldberg, the Leubsdorf Fund, and Agnes Gund in support of the Curatorial Certificate Program.

View Event →
Jun
19
to Aug 11

Jason Lazarus: A CENTURY OF DISSENT! in Harlem

  • Hunter East Harlem Gallery (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Jason Lazarus: A CENTURY OF DISSENT! in Harlem

June 19 – August 11, 2017

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
The Silberman School of Social Work
2180 3rd Avenue at 119th Street
New York, NY 10035

Gallery hours: Wednesday–Saturday, 12-5pm

A CENTURY OF DISSENT! is a summer-long, public art studio designed to collaboratively REMAKE protest signs used in Harlem and East Harlem throughout the past century (and up to the present moment) with Jason Lazarus: Artist-in-Residence at Hunter East Harlem Gallery.

Images from Harlem’s history of protests will be culled from research and project participants will collaborate with Lazarus to pick a source image and create a passing life-size facsimile of the original sign of dissent.  In some cases, project participants may also elect to describe a sign they previously mad and marched with in a public protest, and collaborate with Lazarus on crafting a recreation.
By the end of the summer, the Hunter East Harlem Gallery will become a new physical archive that simultaneously presents a multitude of historical moments and messaging, a place for reflection, synthesis, education, and re-examination of the present moment.

The artist will guide participants into collected protest images from greater Harlem, 1917 to the present, and participants will co-create a life size recreation of the original signs using provided materials at the exhibition space.
Groups of any kind are welcome to make a reservation for a session with the artist.  All research and materials will be provided. 
 
PUBLIC PROGRAM as part of the Uptown Triennial:
In the spirit of collectivity, the public is also invited to join Lazarus, Hunter East Harlem Gallery, Columbia University's Wallach Gallery and the Marcus Garvey Park Alliance on Saturday, August 5th at Marcus Garvey Park for a group portrait showcasing every self-identifying artist in Upper Manhattan. More details coming soon.

Jason Lazarus is an artist currently teaching at the University of South Florida, Tampa (Assistant Professor of Art and Art History) and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (Low Residency MFA Program Mentor).  Since 2003, his work has sought experiential forms and methods to grapple with the politics of representation. 

View Event →
May
31
to Jun 2

A Coherently Incoherent Closing Event

  • Hunter East Harlem Gallery (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

A Coherently Incoherent Closing Event

Wednesday, May 31, 2017
6:30–9 pm

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue
New York, NY 10035

Join us for an evening of poetry, music, and general incoherence. Celebrating the last week of The Incoherent Salon at Hunter East Harlem Gallery.

Performances include: 

- Harlem Hidden History, a camera intervention by Paco Cao
- An absurd dialogue between Amélie Gaulier and artist Yana Dimitrova about and around the irregularity of the French vocabulary with a pinch of dramatic fantasy.
- "The Arlington Heights Suite" performed by Pablo Helguera with Brian Linden & Candace Thompson
- Cabaret piano tunes performed by pianist Sophie Zhang
- Slide-Show: a reading of image poems by Jérôme Game  
- Ventriloquist Show: by Cardone the Magician

Information on the performers:

Jérôme Game: is a French poet and writer whose work cuts across various practice and disciplinary borders, notably visual and sonic. He currently lives in New York where he teaches cinema and critical theory at CUNY. www.jeromegame.com vantilequist show by  Cardone the magincian

Amélie Gaulier-Brody: is a French-born performance artist based in Brooklyn since 2014. Her artistic practice is dedicated to embodying and playing with the conditions of the body, objects, architecture, ideas, live music, movement and voice. She has studied contemporary dance, theater, voice work with Meredith Monk, Andrew Morrish, Deborah Hay, Rosalind Crisp. She is the cofounder of HAM, high art moment collective. 

Yana Dimitrova: Born and raised in Bulgaria, Dimitrova received her MFA in Painting(2008) from the Savannah College of Art and Design (USA). Her most recent exhibits took place in Brussels, (Belgium), Amsterdam (The Netherlands), Berlin (Germany), Manchester (UK), New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Atlanta (USA) and Sofia (Bulgaria). Dimitrova is a lecturer at Parsons The New School for Design in New York. Through the use of paintings, drawings, embroideries and installations, Dimitrova questions perceptions of space, often using humor to critique concepts of desire and the proposed values of the every day.

View Event →
May
24
7:00pm 7:00pm

Nuyorican Poets Cafe

Nuyorican Poets Cafe at HEHG

Thursday, March 24, 2017
7–9:30pm

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue
New York, NY 10035

Founded in 1973, the Nuyorican Poets Cafe began as a living room salon in the East Village apartment of writer and poet Miguel Algarin along with other playwrights, poets, and musicians of color whose work was not accepted by the mainstream academic, entertainment or publishing industries. Since then, Nuyorican Poets Cafe has served as a home for groundbreaking works of poetry, music, theater and visual arts with weekly events for the creative and curious.

For the event at HEHG, Nuyorican Poets Cafe has invited some of their poets to perform written works followed by an open-mic slam session, open to anyone interested in the art form.

For more info on Nuyorican Poets Cafe, please visit: http://www.nuyorican.org/

View Event →
May
20
3:00pm 3:00pm

The Creative Stage: in Performance

The Creative Stage: in Performance

Saturday, May 20, 2017
3pm

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue
New York, NY 10035

Please join us for a very special performance by the theater troupes of The Creative Stage. 

Imagine the genius of Mozart, the fun of improv style sketches, singing, dancing, and a bunch of New York City third graders, all mixed up in an original sketch comedy musical extravaganza! This rollicking performance was developed in collaboration between the professional performing artists and New York City kids. The result is a hilarious, imaginative, and completely original performance sure to delight kids and adults, alike.

The Creative Stage offers a variety of uniquely creative performing arts programs for youth. Founded by international opera singer, arts educator, and producer Madeline Bender, innovative classes such as Musical Theater Builders, Dancing Designers, Puppet Theater Builders, and Instrumental Story Tellers, The Creative Stage works with a number of schools in Harlem and Upper Manhattan and professional artists, designers, actors, and musicians to build creative projects for the stage. 

For information on The Creative Stage, see here: http://creativestage.org/

View Event →
May
18
to Jun 4

Hunter MFA Thesis Part 2

Hunter MFA Thesis Part 2

May 18–June 4, 2017
Opening Reception: Thursday, May 18, 6:00–9:00pm

Part 2 of Hunter College's Spring 2017 MFA Thesis exhibition includes the work of twelve graduating MFA students whose work spans across a range of media and examines subjects of gender, sexual identity, nationality, immigration, government, and technology.

Artists exhibiting work include: 
James Bayard
Sujung Chang
Ricardo Contreras
Peter Hoffmeister
Wendy Fulenwider Liszt
Laura McMillian
Alexander Perrelli
Christian Rogers
Arkadiy Ryabin
Lena Schmid
Ahna Serendren
Chris Spangler

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on the south side of Canal Street between Hudson and Watts
Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

Facebook link:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1794082357575500/

View Event →
May
10
6:00pm 6:00pm

Social Justice Book Club

Social Justice Book Club

Wednesday, May 10, 2017
6–8pm

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue
New York, NY, 10035

The inaugural meeting of Social Justice Book Club meets inside The Incoherents Salon. Please join us in discussing the acclaimed book, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander. 

The Social Justice Book Club is organized by SSW Social Justice Committee members and faculty Willie Tolliver, Colleen Henry, Alexis Jemal, and Kanako Okuda.  

View Event →
May
7
6:00pm 6:00pm

OPAVIVARÁ! in Action

OPAVIVARÁ!
in Action

Sunday, May 7, 2017
6–8pm

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue
New York, NY 10035

The Brazilian collective OPAVIVARÁ! will create a very special act at HEHG around their practices of social engagement and public interventions. Taking up the themes of The Incoherents, the collective will present an active, time-based work that revolves around audience participation.

This program is a collaboration with the Guggenheim Museum.

View Event →
Apr
25
3:00pm 3:00pm

Figure Drawing Session

Figure Drawing Session

Tuesday, April 25, 2017
3-5pm

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue
New York, NY 10035

You're invited to a free figure drawing session inside The Incoherents Salon at Hunter East Harlem Gallery. Our experienced model Natasha will be at HEHG for you to practice your drawing skills. Please bring your own drawing supplies. 

Made possible by the Hunter College Art Department.

View Event →
Apr
21
to Apr 23

El Salón: Potluck Dinner

  • Hunter East Harlem Gallery (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
Paw Paw, Papey, Papaya, El Salón at Alice Yard in Trinidad, 2016 photo by Sneha Ganguly.

Paw Paw, Papey, Papaya, El Salón at Alice Yard in Trinidad, 2016 photo by Sneha Ganguly.

El Salón: Potluck Dinner

Friday, April 21, 2017
7–9:30pm

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue
New York, NY 10035

You're invited to join us for a special potluck event, El Salón, inside The Incoherents Salon.

El Salón is a collective of artist that host a series of potluck dinners every third-Friday of the month. These dinners are thoughtfully curated around artists, arts workers, and cultural producers to present their work to likeminded colleagues. This networking program  aims to contextualize shared experiences in our current socio-political moment. Our meeting place changes month to month from an apartment, to a loft, to a gallery, to wherever our network extends and welcomes us and this month will be at Hunter East Harlem Gallery.

Open to all, please bring a delicious dish and an experience to share!

#ElSalónPotluck, #ElSalonPotluck

View Event →
Apr
20
to Apr 21

Talk Hole: NÎCE HOLE* 
Comedy Night

  • Hunter East Harlem Gallery (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Talk Hole: NÎCE HOLE*
Comedy Night

Thursday, April 20, 2017
7–9pm

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 3rd Avenue at 119th Street
New York, NY 10035

NÎCE HOLE*
The comedic arts collective Talk Hole (b. 2015, New York), will stage a takeover of the HEHG. A symposia like no other, this one-night only, immersive banquet of avant-garde performance will be nothing less than a total gut renovation of the classic French salon borrowing themes of satire from The Incoherents.

Talk Hole is Steven Phillips-Horst and Eric Schwartau.

*“Nice” as in Nice, France, the city on the Mediterranean coast.

View Event →
Apr
20
to May 7

Hunter MFA Thesis Part 1

Hunter MFA Thesis Part 1

April 20–May 7, 2017
Opening Reception: Thursday, April 20, 6:00–9:00pm

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on the south side of Canal Street between Hudson and Watts
Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

View Event →
Apr
8
to May 7

Homecoming: Katherine Behar, Oliver Herring, Julia Jacquette, Yashua Klos

Homecoming: Katherine Behar, Oliver Herring, Julia Jacquette, Yashua Klos

Organized by Sarah Watson with Jenn Bratovich

April 8–May 7, 2017

Leubsdorf Gallery
Hunter West Building
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY 10065

Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

The Hunter College Art Galleries are pleased to announce Homecoming, an exhibition of four Hunter Studio Art MFA alumni: Katherine Behar (MFA 2009), Oliver Herring (MFA 1991), Julia Jacquette (MFA 1992) and Yashua Klos (MFA 2009).  The exhibition, scheduled to open in conjunction with Hunter college-wide Alumni Reunion on Saturday, April 8, 2017, will be on view through Sunday, May 7, 2017.  The exhibition marks the inauguration of a new initiative, also entitled “Homecoming,” developed in collaboration with the MFA Student Organization, and designed to foster connections between current Hunter MFA students and Hunter MFA alumni in a variety of ways, including an annual exhibition in the Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery.  This year’s inaugural Homecoming exhibition offers the opportunity to highlight the work of just some of Hunter’s internationally recognized alumni artists, allowing our current students to gain a greater understanding of their practice in advance of the visits, interviews, lectures, and tours that are part of the broader initiative. During this exhibition, the gallery will also collaborate with the alumni artists to organize undergraduate-specific programming.

Homecoming artists: the inaugural year includes the artists Katherine Behar (MFA 2009), Oliver Herring (MFA 1991), Julia Jacquette (MFA 1992) and Yashua Klos (MFA 2009).

Exhibitions in the Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery are made possible by the generous support of the Leubsdorf Fund, the David Bershad Family Foundation, the Susan V. Bershad Charitable Fund, Inc., Arthur and Carol Kaufman Goldberg, and Joan and Charles Lazarus.

Katherine Behar (Hunter MFA 2009) explores issues of gender and labor in contemporary digital culture. Her work has been presented at festivals, galleries, and performance spaces throughout North America and Europe. Her survey exhibition and catalog Katherine Behar: Data's Entry | Veri Girişi was presented at the Pera Museum in Istanbul, Turkey, in 2016. A previous solo exhibition and catalog, Katherine Behar: E-Waste, premiered at the University of Kentucky in 2014 and traveled to Boston Cyberarts Gallery, MA. Since 2005 she has collaborated with Marianne M. Kim in the performance art duo Disorientalism. Behar is the editor of Object-Oriented Feminism, published by University of Minnesota Press in 2016. Her publications And Another Thing: Nonanthropocentrism and Art, coedited with Emmy Mikelson, and Bigger than You: Big Data and Obesity were published by punctum books the same year.

She has received fellowships and grants from the MacDowell Colony, the Rubin Museum of Art, the Franklin Furnace Fund, and others. Behar holds an MFA in combined media from Hunter College, an MA in media ecology from New York University, and a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She is based in New York and is Assistant Professor of New Media Arts at Baruch College, CUNY.

Oliver Herring (Hunter MFA 1991) received a BFA from the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, University of Oxford, UK and an MFA from Hunter College. Throughout the 1990s, Herring became known for hand-knit Mylar and tape sculptures. Inspired by the death of playwright and drag performer Ethyl Eichelberger, the project lasted ten years, and revolved around marking time through the accumulation of incremental stitched units. In the late 1990s his practice expanded to include improvised stop-motion videos and performances that at first involved friends and eventually strangers on the street. These interactive works were counterpoints to the more stationary and solitary work practice of knitting. A few years later Herring began using volunteers and photography to create elaborately constructed fragmented three-dimensional photo sculptures. Much of his recent work involves human interaction, progressing towards unexpected and/or unpredictable finales.

In 2002, Herring created the improvisatory art event TASK, an ongoing series of events, workshops and parties in which participants of all ages and demographics collectively dream up instructions and carry them out with the materials provided. Increasingly, TASK has become a tool in classrooms and communities to access contemporary art in ways that are experimental, open-ended, and accessible to anyone.

Herring’s work has been exhibited widely. In the United States, his work has been shown at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum of Art, New York; the Whitney Museum of Art, New York; Performa 09, New York; the Hirschhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; the Baltimore Museum of Art, MD; The Frye Art Museum, Seattle, WA; the Blanton Art Museum, Austin, TX; and the Denver Art Museum, CO. Elsewhere, he has exhibited at the Camden Art Center, London, UK; the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, UK; The Kyoto Art Center, Japan; the 10th Lyon Biennale, France; Configura II, Erfurt, Germany; and the 2010 Aichi Triennale, Nagoya, Japan. Me Us Them, a fifteen-year survey of Herring's work, was organized in 2009 at the Tang Museum, Saratoga Springs, NY.

Julia Jacquette (Hunter MFA 1992) is an American artist based in New York City and Amsterdam. Her work has been shown extensively at galleries and museums around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA; and the RISD Museum, Providence, RI, among other institutions. Jacquette’s work was included in the first installment of MoMA PS1's Greater New York exhibition, and was the subject of a retrospective at the Tang Museum in Saratoga Springs, NY. She has taught at the Rhode Island School of Design and Princeton University, and is currently on the faculty at the Fashion Institute of Technology, New York. Jacquette’s work is currently the subject of a major museum retrospective at the Wellin Museum of Art at Hamilton College, Clinton, NY. Unrequited and Acts of Play comprises paintings, site-specific murals, and a series of gouache drawings.

Yashua Klos (Hunter MFA 2009) was born in 1977 in Chicago, IL. He currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. Klos obtained an MFA at Hunter College, and a BFA at Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL. He was awarded a New York Foundation for the Arts grant in 2015 and the Joan Mitchell Award in 2014.

Klos’s solo shows include Blank Black, Galerie Anne De Villepoix Paris, FR, 2016; How To Hide in the Wind, Papillion Art, Los Angeles, CA (2016); As Below, So Above, Jack Tilton Gallery, New York (2015); and We Come Undone, Jack Tilton Gallery, New York (2013). Other recent group shows include: Imagine, Brand New Gallery, Milan, Italy (2016); Broken English, Tyburn Gallery, London, UK (2015); To Be Young, Gifted, and Black, curated by Hank Willis Thomas, Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg, South Africa (2015); In Plain Sight, Opa Locka ARC, Florida (2014); Draw 2014 Symposium, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (2014); and Fore, Studio Museum Harlem in Harlem, New York (2012). Klos has participated in the residency programs at Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts, Omaha, NE; Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, TV; and Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture, Skowhegan, ME.

View Event →
Apr
6
6:08pm 6:08pm

Reading by Lisa Russ Spaar with Suzannah Spaar and Jocelyn Spaar

Reading by Lisa Russ Spaar with Suzannah Spaar and Jocelyn Spaar

Organized in conjunction with the exhibition Elective Affinities: A Library

Thursday, April 6, 6:30–8:30pm

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on the south side of Canal between Hudson and Watts

In the spirit of its theme of fostering creative family trees, 205 Hudson Gallery's Elective Affinities: A Library will host a reading by poet, essayist, and anthologist Lisa Russ Spaar, from her just published fifth collection of poetry, Orexia (Persea Books, 2017).  Reading with Spaar will be her daughters, the poet Suzannah Spaar and the poet, artist, and translator Jocelyn Spaar.  

Lisa Russ Spaar is the author of ten collections of poetry, essays, and edited anthologies; her awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship and a Rona Jaffe Award, and her essays and reviews have appeared in the New York Times, The Washington Post, The Los Angeles Review of Books, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and elsewhere.  She is a professor of English and Creative Writing at the University of Virginia.

Facebook link:
https://www.facebook.com/events/593516287513997/

View Event →
Apr
5
6:08pm 6:08pm

Calling All Collectives: A Community Action Forum

Calling All Collectives: A Community Action Forum

Hosted by the Visual Resistance in conjunction with the exhibition Elective Affinities: A Library

Wednesday, April 5, 2017, 6–9pm

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on the south side of Canal between Hudson and Watts

The Visual Resistance (TVR) is a superforce of creative activists united to resist oppression and imagine a liberated future. We are excited to be working in a rapidly expanding field with many contributors, collectives, and individuals working with similar determination.  As such, we are inviting all the Resistance family, especially those using visuals/media/images/film/etc. to April’s forum, so we can learn about each other's work and get a better sense of our intersections, discovering ways to join forces, share resources, and grow stronger together.

This will be the third forum and the theme is Calling All Collectives. The forum will include brief presentations by several collectives including, #ArtsGoBK, BRIC, Chinatown and Lower East Side Artists Against Displacement, The Creative Resistance, the Diverse Filmmakers Alliance, Desis Rising Up & Moving (DRUM) - Moving Arts, For Freedoms, Hands Off Our Revolution, Hunter Community Action Coalition, The Illuminator, Kingsbridge Project, Love City Arts Collective, Occupy Museums, Resistance Media Collective, TVR-Imagine Liberation team, TVR-News, Wendy's Subway, Word Up Books, along with many others. There will also be breakout discussions and the evening will close with a few short readings. 

To get an idea of the March forum at Aperture, check out the program from the event and this Hyperallergic post.

Facebook link:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1828259997423465/

 

View Event →
Apr
1
12:00pm12:00pm

“out of story”: poetry, politics, and praxis

Erica Baum, Page Pencil, 2013 (Dog Ear) and Spectators, 2009 (Dog Ear), archival pigment prints, 9 x 9 in., edition of 6 + II AP.  Courtesy the artist and Bureau, New York

Erica Baum, Page Pencil, 2013 (Dog Ear) and Spectators, 2009 (Dog Ear), archival pigment prints, 9 x 9 in., edition of 6 + II AP.  Courtesy the artist and Bureau, New York

“out of story”: poetry, politics, and praxis

Saturday, April 1, 2017
12–8pm

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on the south side of Canal between Hudson and Watts

12pm: Story time hosted by Word Up with coffee and pastries

1pm: Bookmaking workshop by Esther K. Smith of Purgatory Pie Press

5–6pm: Artist/curator, Janna Dyk of Brooklyn Press in conversation with artists Golnar Adili and Adam Golfer about how family history and language navigate sociopolitical landscapes in their recent book works.

6–8pm: Readings by Erica Baum, Georgia Faust, Jasmine Gibson, Janelle Poe, and Derica Shields

Reception to follow

12pm: Story time hosted by Word Up

Word Up Community Bookshop/Librería Comunitaria came into existence when a group of neighbors decided to make a space where their community could gather, exchange, grow, learn, laugh, argue, and reflect together. As a completely volunteer-run endeavor going on 6 years in Washington Heights—an underresourced part of the city that is often left off the map of Manhattan—we have built a family from our daily work of caring for the shop and its people. The books we have selected for inclusion in this exhibition feature some of the voices of our neighborhood. Home at Word Up: The Story of a Bookshop in Washington Heights is a bilingual children's book that the volunteer collective created together after our crowdfunding campaign that allowed us to move into our current, more permanent space. 

1pm: Bookmaking workshop by Esther K. Smith of Purgatory Pie Press

Purgatory Pie Press is one of the longest running artist/presses. Founder Dikko Faust handsets antique metal and wood type and typographic elements and letterpress prints on a Vandercook, collaborating with artistic director Esther K Smith and other artists and writers. They have had exhibitions at the Metropolitan Museum, the V&A, and been included in group exhibitions at MoMA; collections including Cooper Hewitt, the Whitney, National Gallery, Smithsonian, San Francisco MoMA, Tate, Harvard, Yale and many other rare book libraries through the world.

5–6pm: Artist/curator, Janna Dyk of Brooklyn Press in conversation with artists Golnar Adili and Adam Golfer

GOLNAR ADILI
Golnar Adili is a mixed media artist based in Brooklyn. She was born in Virginia and moved to Iran when she was four. She left Iran to pursue higher education in the US. She holds a Master's degree in architecture from the University of Michigan, where she received the Thesis Award and was the recipient of the Booth Traveling Fellowship to Tehran, in 2006. She has attended residencies at the Rockefeller Foundation for the Arts in Bellagio, Italy, Smack Mellon in Brooklyn, the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the MacDowell Colony, Ucross Foundation for the Arts, Lower East Side Printshop, and Women’s Studio Workshop among others.

Some of the venues Adili has shown her work include, Craft and Folk Art Museum LA, Cue Art Foundation, International Print Center NY, Brooklyn Arts Council, and the Lower East Side Printshop. Some of the grants she has received include the Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant, The Jerome Foundation Travel and Study Grant, Foundation for Contemporary Arts Grant, the New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship in Printmaking/Drawing/Artists Books, Puffin Foundation Grant, and the Urban Artist Initiative grant. Golnar is currently a resident at the Center for Book Arts in New York.

JANNA DYK
Janna Dyk resides in New York, where she is an artist and independent curator. In 2015 she received a MFA in Combined Media from Hunter College, after continuing studies in Photography at the School of Visual Arts (New York), and Literature and Spanish Linguistics as an undergraduate. A 2016 Rema Hort Foundation ACE Grant recipient, she has exhibited work and participated in residencies in the United States, Lebanon, and China. Recent exhibitions include Unravelled (2016) at the Beirut Art Center, To Tell You (2015), and Shall We Talk or Will We Just Gaze (2014), at 205 Hudson Street (New York). Her cross-disciplinary work navigates such varied subjects as psychology, linguistics, poetry, and perception. A 2015-16 curatorial fellow at Booklyn, select projects include [ON SILENCE] (2012) at the New York Center for Art & Media Studies, OPEN CAGE: NEW YORK (2012) at Eyebeam Center for Art + Technology; Strange Labor (2015), Cottage Industry (2015), Hard to Place (2016), and Valid From Until (2016) at Booklyn. She is editor of A House Without a Roof, a trilingual artist book by Adam Golfer. Her art and curatorial projects have been reviewed in The Curator, SEEN, ArtForum, Art in America, the NY Times, and Hyperallergic. In the Spring of 2017 she is a curatorial resident at the Marble House Project.

ADAM GOLFER
Adam Golfer is a photographer and filmmaker based in Brooklyn. His short films “Router” and “We’ll Do the Rest,” look at the socio-psychological spaces between histories, where complexity and contradiction challenge the way we understand the past, present and the future. Echoes of his own family histories are often present, although the geography, time and place may be entirely different. Recent exhibitions of his work have been shown at 205 Hudson Gallery at Hunter College, Booklyn, the Camera Club and the 92nd Street Y in New York. His commissions have appeared in The New York Times, FT Weekend, Art21, TIME, Harper’s, Die Zeit and the New Yorker, among others. In September 2015, Golfer's solo exhibition at Booklyn, “A House Without a Roof,” was a critic’s pick in Art Forum. With generous grants from the Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation and the Puffin Foundation, the subsequent book was published in 2016. “A House Without a Roof,” was shortlisted for the Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation First Book Award, the Mack First Book Award and was awarded the Snider Prize from the MOCP in Chicago.

6–8pm: Readings by Erica Baum, Georgia Faust, Jasmine Gibson, Janelle Poe, and Derica Shields

ERICA BAUM
Erica Baum, lives and works in New York. Current and recent museum exhibitions include Arcades: Contemporary Art and Walter Benjamin, The Jewish Museum, New York. For the Love of Things, Albright-Knox Gallery, Buffalo, New York 2016, Photo-Poetics: An Anthology, Kunsthalle Berlin and Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 2015; Reconstructions: Recent Photographs and Video from the Met Collection, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 2015; After Dark, Mamco, Geneva, 2015; and the 30th Bienal de São Paulo: The Imminence of Poetics, São Paulo, Brazil, 2012. Recent solo exhibitions include The Following Information, Bureau, New York, 2016; Stanzas, Galerie Crevecoeur, Paris, 2015; The Paper Nautilus, Bureau, New York, 2014

GEORGIA FAUST
Georgia Luna Smith Faust was born, raised, and currently lives in lower Manhattan where she presides over poetry and corporate bankruptcy administration. She is the author of the chapbook Too Faust Too Furious (Resolving Host, 2016), the collaborative artist book, Pests of Public Importance (Purgatory Pie Press, 2016), and the forthcoming collection Too Big to Fail (Metatron, 2017). She holds a BA in Literature and American Studies from Macalester College and an MFA in poetry from Brooklyn College.

JASMINE GIBSON
Jasmine Gibson is a Philly jawn now living in Brooklyn and soon to be psychotherapist for all your gooey psychotic episodes that match the bipolar flows of capital. She spends her time thinking about sexy things like psychosis, desire and freedom. She has written for Mask Magazine and LIES Vol II: Journal of Materialist feminism, Queen Mobs, NON, The Capilano Review and has published a chapbook, Drapetomania (Commune Editions, 2015).

JANELLE POE
Multidisciplinary artist and City College of New York MFA student in creative writing, Poe’s writing explores the intersections of injustice, primarily race, class and gender, along with the nuances of privilege and oppression. A DJ with degrees in international studies, Spanish, and fashion design, and nearly twenty years living in New York City working in corporate and non-profit sectors, the influence of her diverse experiences and travels is transparent in her writing as is her Black, feminist and American identities. A VONA/Voices of Our Nation participant and coordinator of the CCNY MFA Reading Series, she is committed to building community amongst artists and creating opportunities for artists to gather and share their truth. 

Janelle has performed at Nuyorican Poets Cafe, Revolution Books, and Printed Matter in New York City. Recent publications include “Eyes of The Tiger” in Aster(ix) literary journal’s Winter ’16 Edition and "Black & White Studies”, a zine created alongside the painter Sheryl Oppenheim with Small Editions press.

DERICA SHIELDS
Derica Shields is a writer, editor, and programmer from South London. Her day job is Features Editor at Rookie. In 2013, she co-founded The Future Weird, a screening and discussion foregrounding weird, experimental, and speculative films by black artists and directors. Her research interests include black literature, visual art, film, and futurisms. 

Facebook link:
https://www.facebook.com/events/428956914111588/

View Event →
Mar
13
to Jun 3

The Incoherents Salon

  • Hunter East Harlem Gallery (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Incoherents Salon
A Mise-en-scène by Pablo Helguera and Dannielle Tegeder

March 13 – June 3, 2017
Opening Reception: Monday, March 13, 2017, 6–9pm

Organized by Arden Sherman, Curator, Hunter East Harlem Gallery and Hunter College Curatorial Certificate MA and MFA students

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
2180 Third Avenue at 119th Street
New York, NY 10035

Hours: Tuesday–Saturday 12–5pm

Hunter East Harlem Gallery launches The Incoherents Salon, a mise-en-scène produced by the artists Pablo Helguera and Dannielle Tegeder inspired by the protomodern French artistic movement, Les Arts Incohérents.

Founded by publisher and writer Jules Lévy in Paris in 1882, The Incoherents were a collective made up of artists and writers who organized humorous exhibitions as a satirical response to the aesthetic and political circumstances of the time. In the midst of our current restless political moment, Helguera and Tegeder’s theatrical mise-en-scène offers a tribute to a group of artists that used satire as a weapon to push against the status quo and embodied a critical spirit that would later become a common denominator of the avant-garde.

For over ten years (1882-1895), The Incoherents took up a format of a hybrid cabaret and salon, and the happenings of the group fell somewhere between free artistic expression and public entertainment. Artworks created by the group were parodies of famous pieces of art, political and social satire, costume balls, graphical puns, and monographic paintings directly mocking the Impressionists. Cleverly curated locations contributed to the success of these humorous exhibition-demonstrations and were meant to rebel against the seriousness and boredom of popular events and popular sentiments of the time. Additionally, The Incoherents self published catalogues, fictional artist statements, and created well-orchestrated advertising campaigns using newspapers, flyers, and personal invitations to promote their happenings, and they even donated proceeds from their admission fees to charity. De-professionalization was one of the major characteristics of The Incoherents, whereby painters might take up writing, exhibitions of drawing would be launched by those who couldn’t draw, and architects might become financial analysts. Absurdity and provocation were the driving mission of the group.

Moreover, Les Arts Incoérents introduced the usefulness of satire, humor, and political provocation within cultural production, acting as precursors to the avant-garde cabarets of the early 20th century and the performative interventions of Surrealism and Dada, and could be said were early influencers to movements like Fluxus. Their theaters of conversation and exchange, or cabarets, played a critical role in the emergence of what philosopher Jürgen Habermas termed the, “public sphere” which emerged in “cultural-political contras” to court society.

With this history in mind, Helguera and Tegeder consider Hunter East Harlem Gallery, where socially-minded art projects are on display, as a site for a revistitation of the experimentation and elements of Les Arts Incohérents. From March 13 to June 3, 2017, Helguera, Tegeder, and Hunter East Harlem Gallery invite artists, community members, and creatives into the gallery to present time-based projects that embrace The Incoherents' commitment to social engagement and community-oriented exhibition-making.

This exhibition is made possible by the Goldberg Fund in support of the Curatorial Certificate program at Hunter College.

For further information on programming schedule, please visit:
www.huntereastharlemgallery.org/progams

View Event →
Feb
18
to Apr 9

Elective Affinities: A Library

Elective Affinities: A Library

Curated by Jocelyn Spaar and Sarah Watson

February 18–April 9, 2017
Opening Reception: Tuesday, February 21, 6:30–8:30pm

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
New York, NY 10013
Entrance on the south side of Canal Street between Hudson and Watts
Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

With a library you are free, not confined by temporary political climates. It is the most democratic of institutions because no one—but no one at all—can tell you what to read and when and how. ­­—Doris Lessing

For the 2017 spring season, the Hunter College Art Galleries have transformed 205 Hudson Gallery into a library and reading room comprised of works centering on the notion of family and community in a very broad, inclusive sense, whether that pertains to one’s biological or chosen family, artistic or literary lineage, intellectual community, virtual network, or neighborhood. This library is intended to function as a gathering space to host readings, screenings, performances, meetings, and workshops. 

Committed to cultivating conversations by a multiplicity of voices to create an open and inclusive space for dialogue and engagement with art, the gallery has invited artists, small presses, libraries, and organizations to collaborate in the creation of this exhibition to interrogate the concept of family across various selections of printed matter, film, video, and photography.    

The library includes selections from Archipelago Books, Blonde Art Books, Ediciones Popolet, Explorers Club of Enrique de Malacca, Melville House, Miniature Garden, New Directions, Primary Information, Purgatory Pie Press, Roof Books, Seven Stories Press, Small Editions, The Song Cave, Stonecutter, Ugly Duckling Presse, Verso, Wendy’s Subway and Word Up Books, with works by artists Erica Baum, Joey Carducci, Kevin Everson, Barbara Hammer, Shigeko Kubota, Sondra Perry, and Bryan Zanisnik.

Our hope is that Elective Affinities: A Library continues to evolve and expand through the creativity, intellect, insight, diversity, connectivity, and power of all who occupy the space.

Press
Untapped Cities
The Culture Trip

View Event →
Oct
13
to Feb 11

Spots, Dots, Pips, Tiles

  • Hunter East Harlem Gallery (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Spots, Dots, Pips, Tiles

Curated by Arden Sherman and María Elena Ortiz

October 13, 2016–February 11, 2017

Hunter East Harlem Gallery
2180 Third Avenue at 119th Street
New York, NY 10035

Hours: Tuesday–Saturday 12–5pm

Hunter East Harlem Gallery at Hunter College is pleased to present the exhibition, Spots, Dots, Pips, Tiles: An exhibition about dominoes. The group exhibition showcases artworks that reflect the multilayered aspects of the domino game, a tradition that is heavily practiced in the neighborhood of East Harlem and communities with strong Caribbean ties. The show features over 19 international contemporary artists working in a variety of media, including painting, mixed-media, sculpture, installation, and video.

Spots, Dots, Pips, Tiles examines how artists have approached the game of dominoes—its history, community, strategy, and aesthetics—as metaphor and practice. Dominoes, a popular game with origins dating to ancient China, has a discernible aesthetic, political vantage point and offers a look into specific communities that grow around the domino table.

Many of the works in Spots, Dots, Pips, Tiles directly reference the game of dominoes, take up the actual tiles themselves as visual language, and explore the impact of the game on the lives of artists like Donald Evans, Nari Ward, and Edra Soto & Dan Sullivan. Other artists like Glendalys Medina, Erika Verzutti, and José Bento take up the aesthetics of the game—the stark contrast of black on white, the geometry of the tile and the square game table, or the discerning look of concentrated “strategy” in mid-play. Artists like Papo Colo, Rodolfo Peraza, and Betye Saar approach the subject in terms of larger human conditions like political struggles, religious beliefs, and racial stereotypes. Inside the gallery, visitors will encounter a documentary section containing over two dozen historical and contemporary photographs and ephemera from around the world, underscoring the breadth of the game internationally. Spots, Dots, Pips, Tiles is threaded with examples of artists addressing the complexities of dominoes as game and a metaphor for community, aesthetic inspiration, and theory for international relationships.

The exhibition will have complementary public programming, such as domino games, domino competitions, domino stacking, and artist talks and workshops to emphasize the community-building aspects of the game and the game as an instrument for learning.

Artists included in documentary section: ADÁL, Charlotte Amalie, Gerry Balding, Ian Berry, Carsten ten Brink, Luis Carle, Adam Cohn, Dottie Day, Master Sgt. Laura K. Deckman, Jack Delano, Mubarak Fahad, Mingo Hagen, Paul Keller, Liralen Li, Nate Marvin, Susan Meiselas, Maria de las Mercedes, Bo Nielsen, Kyoko Nishimoto, Daniel Noll and Audrey Scott, Carlos Ortiz, Edwin Rosskam, Justin Schier, Marion Post Wolcott, Patrick Zachmann, Center for Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College and more.

View Event →
Sep
30
to Nov 20

Something Possible Everywhere: Pier 34 NYC, 1983–84

Something Possible Everywhere: Pier 34 NYC, 1983–84

Curated by Jonathan Weinberg
Featuring the photographs of Andreas Sterzing

September 30–November 20, 2016
Opening Reception: Friday, September 30, 7–9pm

205 Hudson Gallery
Hunter College Art Galleries
205 Hudson Street
Entrance on Canal Street between Hudson and Greenwich Streets
New York, NY 10013

Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm  

Something Possible Everywhere: Pier 34 NYC, 1983–84 is the first exhibition to revisit the extraordinary place and time when David Wojnarowicz and his friends and peers including Jane Bauman, Mike Bidlo, Keith Davis, Steve Doughton, John Fekner, David Finn, Jean Foos, Luis Frangella, Valeriy Gerlovin, Judy Glantzman, Alain Jacquet, Kim Jones, Rob Jones, Ruth Kligman, Stephen Lack, Liz-N-Val, Bill Mutter, Michael Ottersen, Rick Prol, Russell Sharon, Kiki Smith, Huck Snyder, Betty Tompkins, and Ruth Zwillinger among many others, effectively seized a city-owned pier and filled it with art. Andreas Sterzing’s remarkable photographs, along with related images by Peter Hujar, Marisela La Grave, and Dirk Rowntree, document how these artists turned the Ward Line shipping terminal at the foot of Canal Street, into a series of makeshift art galleries and studios.

Accompanying Sterzing’s photographs are over 75 paintings, drawings, and sculptures, made by the many artists who worked on the pier. Sadly, the building was demolished and almost all of the art made on the pier no longer exists, but the presence of contemporaneous work in the exhibition makes tangible something of the physicality of the waterfront art and its larger aesthetic context.

The numerous artists who worked on Pier 34 crossed generations, from established figures like Alain Jacquet and Ruth Kligman, to emerging artists like Steven Doughton and Rhonda Zwillinger.  They utilized a variety of media and styles, from the performance art of Kim Jones and Paolo Buggiani, to the expressionism of Judy Glantzman and Stephen Lack. This diversity and the site-specificity of works by artists like John Fekner and Teres Wydler, challenges the stereotypes of the 1980s art scene as market-driven and conservative with a turn toward easel painting. Indeed, the chief instigators of the Pier 34 experiment, Wojnarowicz and Bidlo, self-consciously saw the site as anti-commercial.

As rumors spread in the spring of 1983 of what was happening on the waterfront, Bidlo and Wojnarowicz released a statement to friends in the press that explained their resistance to the gallery system and the aim to create an opportunity for anyone “to explore any image in any material on any surface they chose.  It was something no gallery would tolerate…” Above all, they claimed that Pier 34 forged a community: “People who lived in this city for years said it was the first time they experienced fulfillment in terms of contact with the art scene and strangers.”

This exhibition is made possible by the generous support provided by Carol and Arthur Goldberg, Joan and Charles Lazarus, Dorothy Lichtenstein, and an anonymous donor.

Press
Art Forum
Art in America
HyperAllergic
New York Times
New Yorker

View Event →
Sep
22
to Nov 20

Nahum Tevet: Works on Glass, 1972–1975

Nahum Tevet: Works on Glass 1972–1975

Curated by Thierry de Duve, Evelyn Kranes Kossak Professor of Art History

September 22–November 20, 2016
Opening Reception: Thursday, September 22, 6–8pm

Leubsdorf Gallery
Hunter West Building
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY 10065

Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 1–6pm

Curated by Thierry de Duve, Evelyn Kranes Kossak Professor of Art History, Nahum Tevet: Works on Glass, 1972–1975 presents an important and under-recognized series from the artist’s oeuvre. This exhibition will provide a critical examination of this series in relationship with the broader art historical context of global conceptualism and minimalism dominant in the late 1960s and 1970s. Tevet’s works on glass are both unique and perfectly in tune with the experiments conducted internationally by the most advanced artists of that time. They are radically modernist in every sense: uncompromising, experimental, and taking that own conventions as their subject matter.

These works consist of unframed glass planes with pieces of paper, cardboard, and tape affixed to either front or back of the glass. The works are suspended by wire or twine attached to metal clips clamped around the edges of the glass, often exposing their rudimentary hanging system. They evolved out of drawings Tevet was making as preparatory sketches for equally radical objects—which he called sculptures, but which evoke furniture—and can be seen as an Arte Povera version of Donald Judd’s “specific objects.” Eventually, the drawings and their tentative glass framing devices became works in their own right, with a status separate from the artist’s other works.  

Of Tevet’s works on glass there are some thirty known extant pieces. In 1975, thirteen were exhibited at Galerie Schmela in Düsseldorf, however, this body of work has never been shown as a comprehensive series. Nahum Tevet: Works on Glass, 1972–1975 brings the glass works together for the first time, expanding the understanding of Tevet's oeuvre and its historical context, while also introducing his work to new audiences. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated publication that functions as a catalogue raisonné of the works on glass. The gallery will host a full roster of public programs in conjunction with the show.

Nahum Tevet (born 1946 in Kibbutz Messilot, Israel) has lived and worked in Tel Aviv since 1973. His work has been the topic of several solo exhibitions including Walking on The Wall, Nahum Tevet Small Sculptures, 1980–2012, Tel Aviv University Art Gallery, 2012; Nahum Tevet, Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Roma (MACRO), 2008; Nahum Tevet: Works, 1994–2006, The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, 2007; Nahum Tevet: Take Two, Le Quartier, Center for Contemporary Art, Quimper, France, 2005; and Opening Moves, Nahum Tevet Sculptures, Museum of Modern Art, Ludwig Foundation, Vienna, 1997.  His work is included in many important museum collections including The Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA; Portland Art Museum, Portland, OR; Museum of Modern Art, Ludwig Foundation, MUMOK, Vienna, Austria; Kaiser Wilhelm Museum, Krefeld, Germany; FRAC Bretagne, France; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem; and Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Tel Aviv. Tevet has received several distinguished awards including the EMET Prize for Art, Science and Culture, The Office of The Prime Minister of Israel & A.M.N Foundation, 2013; the Dizengoff Prize for Painting and Sculpture, Tel Aviv-Yafo Municipality, 2011; and the Minister of Culture and Science Prize for Life Achievement in Art, 2013. In addition to his studio practice, Tevet has a sustained commitment to teaching. He was a professor in the Fine Art Department at Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, Tel Aviv Branch, from 1980 to 2013, serving as Head of the Master’s Degree Program in Fine Art from 2001 to 2010. 

Nahum Tevet: Works on Glass, 1972–1975 will travel to Muzeum Sztuki in Łódź, Poland, January 27–April 23, 2017.

This exhibition is made possible by the generous support provided by the Artis Grant Program; The Friends of Bezalel, Academy of Arts and Design, Jerusalem; Carol and Arthur Goldberg; Evelyn Kranes Kossak; Joan and Charles Lazarus; the Leubsdorf Fund; and Outset Contemporary Art Fund.

Press
Art Forum
Art in America
Art Net
Blouin Art Info
Hyperallergic

View Event →
Mar
14
to Dec 31

Bayadères for Two Skywalks: A site-specific work by Daniel Buren

  • Hunter College Art Galleries (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
Photo-souvenir: Bayadères for Two Skywalks, March 2016, work in situ, Hunter College, New York, NY, United States, March–December 2016. © Daniel Buren/ADAGP, Paris. Photo by Bill Orcutt.

Photo-souvenir: Bayadères for Two Skywalks, March 2016, work in situ, Hunter College, New York, NY, United States, March–December 2016. © Daniel Buren/ADAGP, Paris. Photo by Bill Orcutt.

Bayadères for Two Skywalks: A site-specific work by Daniel Buren

Leubsdorf Gallery
Hunter West Building
132 East 68th Street
New York, NY 10065

On view through Saturday December 31, 2016

“It is by working for a given exhibition site that the work in situ—and it alone—opens up the field for a possible transformation of the very place itself.”
— Daniel Buren

Daniel Buren (b. 1938) is a French artist whose work is rooted in the avant-garde conceptual practices of the 1960s. Buren has long engaged in creating large-scale site-specific works, conceiving and executing these works in response to their specific architectural and institutional setting, and using these elements as cues for reimagining the space. For Hunter College, Buren has transformed the iconic skywalks into prismatic passageways, rendering a familiar space unfamiliar. This intervention creates an opportunity to engage with the architecture in a new way—prompting questions about how we experience color, light, and space and how those elements alter the social and physical environment. As in all of Buren’s site-specific work, the artwork itself is only completed through interaction, eliciting the viewers’ intellectual, emotional, and sensorial response as they move through the space.

This work is presented in conjunction with the exhibition Buren, Mosset, Parmentier, Toroni, on view at the Hunter College, 205 Hudson Street Gallery in Tribeca, through April 10, 2016. This exhibition—the first critical examination of the significant, albeit brief, work of the four artists in 1967—seeks to reexamine the group by placing its work in the context of broader conversations surrounding institutional critique, performance, and the role of painting as a political medium.

Bayadères for Two Skywalks is made possible by LVMH / Moët Hennessy–Louis Vuitton with additional support from the David Bershad Family Foundation and Susan V. Bershad Charitable Fund, Inc.; the Brant Foundation, Inc.; Arthur and Carol Kaufman Goldberg; Andrew and Christine Hall; the Hunter College Foundation; Stephen King, C12 Capital Management; the Anna Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation; President Jennifer J. Raab; and an anonymous donor.  

View Event →